FAR, DFARS AND ITAR REGULATION FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

Procurement, design, development and manufacturing of Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) for the United States Department of Defence (DoD) is dictated under the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations Supplement (DFARS) or International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR).  

 

ITAR regulations the control of export from the U.S. of certain military products, parts, components, materials and technology. DFARS impose requirements on U.S. Government prime contractors and lower tier subcontractors regarding the sourcing of services, parts and materials, profit margins, application of certain accounting principles, reporting requirements, terms of payment and provision of various representations and warranties.

 

DFARS Subpart 225.7 prohibits all procurement of PCBs from Mainland Communist China and DFARS Subpart 225.10 states that foreign acquisition can only be conducted from NATO countries or allies of the United States. Any exemption from this regulation requires a deviation approval according to DFARS Subpart 201.4.

 

Countries approved by DoD for PCB manufacturing

  • Europe
    • Albania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Israel, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, United Kingdom
  • Asia
    • Japan, Korea, Philippines, Singapore and Taiwan

* Elmatica manufacturers directly approved by DoD

 

Elmatica is an approved ITAR BROKER and DFARS compliant. DoD require a clause mandating strict compliance with U.S. export and import control laws and regulations is included in all DoD solicitations and contracts, including contracts between prime contractors and subcontractors.

FAR, DFARS and ITAR specifically relates to defense programs of the U.S. Government. FAR, DFARS and ITAR impose requirements on DoD contractors and lower tier subcontractors regarding the sourcing of services, parts, materials, profit margins, application of certain accounting principals, reporting requirements, terms of payment and provision of various representations and warranties.

Violations of these regulations and the U.S. export control laws may lead to civil and criminal penalties of up to $1 million — or twice the value of a transaction and imprisonment — administrative penalties and suspension or debarment from U.S. government contracting. Contractors, whether private industry, research institutions or universities, cannot rely on the Defense Department to explain legal obligations related to export compliance. Nor can contractors assume export control laws do not cover their activities, or rely on questionable interpretations of possible licensing exemptions or exceptions.  

 

If you have any questions or suspect a breach of regulations please contact the U.S. Government organization the “Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy”. The link to their contact site is http://www.acq.osd.mil/dpap/contact_dpap.html



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